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LongTermCare4u.info

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What is Long Term Care?

The most common type of long-term care is personal care—help with everyday activities, also called "activities of daily living." These activities include bathing, dressing, grooming, using the toilet, eating, and moving around—for example, getting out of bed and into a chair.

Long-term care also includes community services such as meals, adult day care, and transportation services. These services may be provided free or for a fee.

People often need long-term care when they have a serious, ongoing health condition or disability. The need for long-term care can arise suddenly, such as after a heart attack or stroke. Most often, however, it develops gradually, as people get older and frailer or as an illness or disability gets worse as with Dementia and Alzheimer.

Who Will Need Long-Term Care?

It is difficult to predict how much or what type of long-term care a person might need. Several things increase the risk of needing long-term care.

  • Age.The risk generally increases as people get older.
  • Gender. Women are at higher risk than men, primarily because they often live longer.
  • Marital status. Single people are more likely than married people to need care from a paid provider.
  • Lifestyle. Poor diet and exercise habits can increase a person's risk.
  • Health and family history. These factors also affect risk.

Long Term Care Cost Statistics-2017

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More on Who will need Long Term Care*

 

  • Annually 8,357,100 people receive support from the 5 main long-term care service; home health agencies (4,742,500), nursing homes (1,383,700), hospices (1,244,500), residential care communities (713,300) and adult day service centers (273,200).1[Updated February 2015]

  • An estimated 12 million Americans needed long-term care in 2007.2 [Updated February 2015]

  • Most but not all persons in need of long-term care are elderly. Approximately 63% are persons aged 65 and older (6.3 million); the remaining 37% are 64 years of age and younger (3.7 million).3

  • The lifetime probability of becoming disabled in at least two activities of daily living or of being cognitively impaired is 68% for people age 65 and older.4

  • By 2050, the number of individuals using paid long-term care services in any setting (e.g., at home, residential care such as assisted living, or skilled nursing facilities) will likely double from the 13 million using services in 2000, to 27 million people. This estimate is influenced by growth in the population of older people in need of care.5

  • Of the older population with long-term care needs in the community, about 30% (1.5 million persons) have substantial long-term care needs (three or more ADL limitations). Of these, about 25% are 85 and older and 70% report they are in fair to poor health.6

  • In 2012, 14.8% of the 65+ population were reported to be below the poverty level. 7 [Updated February 2015]

  • Among the population aged 65+, 69% will develop disabilities before they die, and 35% will eventually enter a nursing home.8 [Updated February 2015]

  • Nearly a fifth of older people will incur more than $25,000 in lifetime out-of-pocket long-term costs before they die.9 [Updated February 2015]

  • The prevalence of cognitive impairment among the older population increased over the past decade, while the prevalence of physical impairment remains unchanged.10

  • In 2002, the percentage of older persons with moderate or severe memory impairment ranged from about 5% among persons aged 65–69 to about 32% among persons aged 85 or older.11

  • Individuals 85 years and older, the oldest old,  are one of the fastest growing segments of the population. In 2012, there are an estimated 5.9 million people 85+ in the United States.12 [Updated February 2015] This figure is expected to increase to 19.4 million by 2050.13 This means that there could be an increase from 1.6 million to 6.2 million people age 85 or over with severe or moderate memory impairment in 2050.
  • *Courtesy of Family Caregivers Alliance

3 Options to Fund this Cost

  1. Be Rich
  2. Be Poor
  3. Be Insured

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70% of people 65 and older will need some kind of long-term care eventually. The obvious question then becomes, who will pay this necessary, but hugely expensive bill?

In a companion survey gauging Americans’ thoughts about long-term care, Genworth found that two-thirds of respondents expected government programs to cover all or part of the costs.

But that’s not going to happen — with a few exceptions.

Medicare does not cover nursing home care except for limited stays after a hospital admission of three days or more. Nor does Medicare pay for in-home care if it’s not skilled nursing care.

Medicaid rules are different for every state. But generally, an individual must have $2,000 or less in assets ($3,000 for a couple) before he or she can be eligible for Medicaid.  

“One thing we see in the survey research is that there’s confusion. I think there’s a lack of education of: How much do things cost? How do they work?” Saunders said.

“It’s really important to be able to plan for one’s long-term care needs, especially as we all begin to age,” he added. “This is starting to become a societal issue. It’s definitely become a silent crisis that is going to need people to act before it gets any worse.”

* Courtesy of Forbes.com